"Books, records, films - these things matter. Call me shallow but it's the fuckin' truth."

"television"
Sunday, April 7, 2013

2brwngrls:

Two Brown Girls - Episode 15

In this episode of Two Brown Girls, we discuss Atlantic City ratchetry, Roger Ebert, Christopher Abbott leaving Girls (and the mysterious “brown-ification” of his character on the show), The EPIC GREAT GATSBY TRAILER (in Zeba’s humble opinion), and finally the problematic elements of hip hop, starting with Rick Ross’s recent lyric controversy (trigger warning for discussion about rape starting approx. 22:00). Happy Sunday!

ALSO ANY AUDIO PROBLEMS YOU HEAR ON TODAY’S PODCAST TOTALLY AREN’T THERE AND YOU SHOULD PROBABLY GET YOUR EARS CHECKED CUZ OUR MACBOOK MICROPHONES ARE FLAWLESS!!

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Sunday, March 24, 2013

2brwngrls:

Two Brown Girls - Episode 14

In this episode of Two Brown Girls, we discuss Tilda Swinton’s MoMA installation, Miley Cyrus and White Girl Twerking, the mystery of Amanda Bynes and her recent @drake tweeting, the controversy around Beyonce’s ‘Bow Down’, and Naomi Campbell’s (amazing) attitude problem on The Face. Also, a big thank you to our listener newjerseyhippie for making us some amazing new 2BG avatars! We can’t wait to use them! Happy Sunday!

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Sunday, March 17, 2013

2brwngrls:

Two Brown Girls - Episode 13

In this supersized episode of Two Brown Girls, we answer provocativegymnastic’s question about the upcoming Veronica Mars movie, discuss Amanda Palmer’s TEDtalk and crowd funding, Azealia Banks and Twitter beef (are black celebs held to a higher standard in the media than others?), and have a frank conversation about the nuances of last week’s Girls episode, ‘On All Fours’*. Happy Sunday!

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*(trigger warning for talk about rape beginning at 34m and ending at 55m)

Sunday, March 3, 2013

2brwngrls:

Two Brown Girls - Episode 11

In this episode of Two Brown Girls, we discuss the beauty of Suraj Sharma and our ~celebrity fantasies~, Law & Order: SVU’s ratchet Chris Brown/Rihanna episode, Anne Hathaway and ‘In Defense of the Happy Girl’ (has the media trained us to hate girlishness?), Zoe Saldana’s comments on her Nina Simone biopic criticism, and our unbridled hatred for James Franco, amongst other things. Happy Sunday!

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Monday, February 25, 2013
New article on Huffingtonpost: Why Lena Dunham’s ‘N-Word’ Response Isn’t Good Enough
When comedienne Lisa Lampanelli sent a picture via her Twitter a few days ago of herself posing with Girls star and creator Lena Dunham, she was no doubt well aware of the firestorm that its caption would spark. The photo, of Lampanelli smiling broadly, with Dunham standing over her holding up bunny ears, was accompanied by the controversy-baiting tweet: “Me with my n***a [Lena Dunham]… I love this beyotch!!”
It was a tweet obviously designed to stir the pot through its offensiveness, offensiveness that was later added to by Lampanelli’s wearyingly banal response in the wake of criticism, the usual crud spouted out by racists and charlatan comics looking to exude a little edge. For Lampanelli, it was about “taking the hate out of the word.” It wasn’t derogatory, she argued, because there was no “-er” on the end, and more importantly because she was referring to someone she admired, a friend.
Whatever.
While Lampanelli’s comments are just plain tedious, I was interested to see how her supposed “friend,” Lena Dunham, would handle the situation. I was disappointed but unsurprised when after four days, Dunham still hadn’t commented publicly on the incident despite her connection to it. And then, thankfully, writer Shayla Pierce, who had already been vocal about her issues with Lampanelli’s comments in several articles, decided to call out the actress/writer on Twitter.
"[Dunham] has showed her true colors on this whole n-word debacle," Pierce wrote, “her silence speaks volumes.”
It’s hard to say how I expected Dunham to respond, or indeed what it was I wanted her to say, but I was left oddly perplexed and a little annoyed by her reply. It started out, more or less, reasonably enough: “That’s not a word I would EVER use. Its implications are beyond my comprehension. I was made supremely uncomfortable by it,” Dunham said, “Perhaps I should have addressed it, but the fact is I’ve learned that Twitter debates breed more Twitter debates.”
For me, the entire exchange between Dunham and Pierce, which went on for several more messages and ended with Pierce thanking the television writer for addressing the issue, offering her “*huggies*” of reconciliation, seemed a little half-assed. However satisfying Dunham’s response may have been for the parties involved or those looking on in Twitter Land, the exchange struck me as Dunham getting let off the hook a little too easily, absolving her without really forcing her to face the issue at hand…
Read the rest here.

New article on Huffingtonpost: Why Lena Dunham’s ‘N-Word’ Response Isn’t Good Enough

When comedienne Lisa Lampanelli sent a picture via her Twitter a few days ago of herself posing with Girls star and creator Lena Dunham, she was no doubt well aware of the firestorm that its caption would spark. The photo, of Lampanelli smiling broadly, with Dunham standing over her holding up bunny ears, was accompanied by the controversy-baiting tweet: “Me with my n***a [Lena Dunham]… I love this beyotch!!”

It was a tweet obviously designed to stir the pot through its offensiveness, offensiveness that was later added to by Lampanelli’s wearyingly banal response in the wake of criticism, the usual crud spouted out by racists and charlatan comics looking to exude a little edge. For Lampanelli, it was about “taking the hate out of the word.” It wasn’t derogatory, she argued, because there was no “-er” on the end, and more importantly because she was referring to someone she admired, a friend.

Whatever.

While Lampanelli’s comments are just plain tedious, I was interested to see how her supposed “friend,” Lena Dunham, would handle the situation. I was disappointed but unsurprised when after four days, Dunham still hadn’t commented publicly on the incident despite her connection to it. And then, thankfully, writer Shayla Pierce, who had already been vocal about her issues with Lampanelli’s comments in several articles, decided to call out the actress/writer on Twitter.

"[Dunham] has showed her true colors on this whole n-word debacle," Pierce wrote, “her silence speaks volumes.”

It’s hard to say how I expected Dunham to respond, or indeed what it was I wanted her to say, but I was left oddly perplexed and a little annoyed by her reply. It started out, more or less, reasonably enough: “That’s not a word I would EVER use. Its implications are beyond my comprehension. I was made supremely uncomfortable by it,” Dunham said, “Perhaps I should have addressed it, but the fact is I’ve learned that Twitter debates breed more Twitter debates.”

For me, the entire exchange between Dunham and Pierce, which went on for several more messages and ended with Pierce thanking the television writer for addressing the issue, offering her “*huggies*” of reconciliation, seemed a little half-assed. However satisfying Dunham’s response may have been for the parties involved or those looking on in Twitter Land, the exchange struck me as Dunham getting let off the hook a little too easily, absolving her without really forcing her to face the issue at hand…

Read the rest here.

Wednesday, January 23, 2013
BBC Announces Call For Comedy Scripts Centered On Transgender Characters (Open To All)

The BBC has put out a call for new comedy scripts that promote positive portrayals of Transgender people in mainstream comedy.

The call is through its Writersroom initiative, which was set up to promote new writing talent.

Callinf it the Trans Comedy Award, the deadline for entries is February 28, and will pay a writer or writers up to£5,000 (about $7,900) to develop a pilot.

The BBC says it looking for original sitcoms, comedy dramas or sketch shows featuring transgender characters and/or themes – written for television.

At the heart of it all is the writer, and at BBC Writersroom it is our passion to find the most exciting writers, voices and stories that might not have been heard and then support them as they work in partnership across the BBC,” said the BBC’s creative director of new writing, Kate Rowland.

Rowland will judge the award along with BBC head of creative resources Ian Critchley, executive producer for BBC Comedy Jon Plowman and an as yet unnamed comedy writer or actor.

By the way, the challenge is open to writers across the globe, BUT with one caveat:

If you are not currently a UK resident you can still submit but, if selected, the UK must be your place of residence for at least two years from the end of May 2013. This is required in order that selected scripts can be developed in conjunction with the BBC as per the current average timeline for development.

So, yes, you can submit from wherever you are, but if your script is selected, be prepared to move to the UK in May, where you’ll live for at least 2 years. If that’s cool with you, then, give it a go.

Click HERE to read the full terms and conditions of the competition.

Good luck!

Thursday, January 10, 2013
New review at Slant Magazine - The Carrie Diaries: Season One
Based on the book series by Sex and the City scribe Candace Bushnell, The Carrie Diaries feels less like a prequel and more like a mediocre parody of ’80s teen dramedies. Set in 1984, future chain-smoking sex columnist Carrie Bradshaw (AnnaSophia Robb) is a teenager living in suburban Connecticut and coping with the death her mother three months earlier. Her love interest, Sebastian Kydd (Austin Butler), is part Blane McDonough from Pretty in Pink and part Jake Ryan from Sixteen Candles, and her best friends are a nerd (Ellen Wong) reeling from first love, a sexually precocious troublemaker (Katie Findlay), and a gay boy (Brendan Dooling) who’s yet to come to terms with his sexuality.
Fashion, which always functioned like a fifth lead character on HBO’s adaptation of Bushnell’s column turned book, feels like a distraction here. Instead of authentically replicating the style of the era, costume designer Eric Daman delivers an odd wardrobe of pieces that look like if they’re straight from the aisles of modern mega-retailers like Forever 21 and TopShop. DayGlo colors and tutus do not the ’80s make, and these anachronisms only add to an overall sense that she show’s creators seem undecided on exactly what tone they want to strike: an edgy, modern teen drama or a nostalgia trip for fans already familiar with Bushnell’s heroine…
Read the rest here.

New review at Slant Magazine - The Carrie Diaries: Season One

Based on the book series by Sex and the City scribe Candace Bushnell, The Carrie Diaries feels less like a prequel and more like a mediocre parody of ’80s teen dramedies. Set in 1984, future chain-smoking sex columnist Carrie Bradshaw (AnnaSophia Robb) is a teenager living in suburban Connecticut and coping with the death her mother three months earlier. Her love interest, Sebastian Kydd (Austin Butler), is part Blane McDonough from Pretty in Pink and part Jake Ryan from Sixteen Candles, and her best friends are a nerd (Ellen Wong) reeling from first love, a sexually precocious troublemaker (Katie Findlay), and a gay boy (Brendan Dooling) who’s yet to come to terms with his sexuality.

Fashion, which always functioned like a fifth lead character on HBO’s adaptation of Bushnell’s column turned book, feels like a distraction here. Instead of authentically replicating the style of the era, costume designer Eric Daman delivers an odd wardrobe of pieces that look like if they’re straight from the aisles of modern mega-retailers like Forever 21 and TopShop. DayGlo colors and tutus do not the ’80s make, and these anachronisms only add to an overall sense that she show’s creators seem undecided on exactly what tone they want to strike: an edgy, modern teen drama or a nostalgia trip for fans already familiar with Bushnell’s heroine…

Read the rest here.

Tuesday, November 6, 2012
Criminal Minds writer and executive producer Janine Sherman Barrois has sold a new crime drama to CBS called Darkness Falls, which will focus on an FBI psychologist and a homicide specialist who solve murders in small communities. If the show becomes a series, Barrois will become showrunner. 
Get it, girl. 

Criminal Minds writer and executive producer Janine Sherman Barrois has sold a new crime drama to CBS called Darkness Falls, which will focus on an FBI psychologist and a homicide specialist who solve murders in small communities. If the show becomes a series, Barrois will become showrunner. 

Get it, girl. 

Tuesday, October 16, 2012
New review on Slant - American Horror Story: Asylum 
When it debuted last year, American Horror Story quickly established itself as a series determined to condense every subgenre of horror into 12 dizzying episodes of visual hyperbole, all brimming with an endless assault of style—and a dash of substance. In the second season of what was earlier this year revealed to be not an anthology, rather than an ongoing series, creators Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuk continue the excess of messy kills and melodramatic monologues, but it’s decidedly more sinister. Leaving the haunted corridors of the Harmon family home behind, American Horror Story: Asylum shifts to Briarcliff Manor, a mental institution in 1964 that’s filled with crazies, aliens, mad scientists, demon-possessed teenagers, and masked men wielding bloody ice picks. It’s Ryan Murphy’s Law: Any and all terrors that can be squeezed into 45 minutes will be…
Read the rest here.

New review on Slant - American Horror Story: Asylum 

When it debuted last year, American Horror Story quickly established itself as a series determined to condense every subgenre of horror into 12 dizzying episodes of visual hyperbole, all brimming with an endless assault of style—and a dash of substance. In the second season of what was earlier this year revealed to be not an anthology, rather than an ongoing series, creators Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuk continue the excess of messy kills and melodramatic monologues, but it’s decidedly more sinister. Leaving the haunted corridors of the Harmon family home behind, American Horror Story: Asylum shifts to Briarcliff Manor, a mental institution in 1964 that’s filled with crazies, aliens, mad scientists, demon-possessed teenagers, and masked men wielding bloody ice picks. It’s Ryan Murphy’s Law: Any and all terrors that can be squeezed into 45 minutes will be…

Read the rest here.

Tuesday, September 18, 2012
New Review on Slant Magazine - Elementary: Season One
CBS, home of the primetime police procedural, has created something of an anomaly in its fall lineup with Elementary. In many ways, the series follows the formula made successful by detective dramas like The Mentalist, CSI, and Criminal Minds that feature crime-solvers who are highly skilled at what they do, but sometimes barely functional as actual human beings. These characters are often misanthropic and intense, so deeply involved in the world of gory homicides and whodunits that they find themselves stumbling as parents, lovers, and friends. This, the viewer is encouraged to believe, is the very thing that makes them so interesting. But what’s sold as complexity in these idiosyncratic geniuses is sometimes really just a series of hollow quirks that mimic rather than build on character, entering realms of such exaggeration that the people in the stories become wholly secondary to the plots…
Read the rest here. 

New Review on Slant Magazine - Elementary: Season One

CBS, home of the primetime police procedural, has created something of an anomaly in its fall lineup with Elementary. In many ways, the series follows the formula made successful by detective dramas like The MentalistCSI, and Criminal Minds that feature crime-solvers who are highly skilled at what they do, but sometimes barely functional as actual human beings. These characters are often misanthropic and intense, so deeply involved in the world of gory homicides and whodunits that they find themselves stumbling as parents, lovers, and friends. This, the viewer is encouraged to believe, is the very thing that makes them so interesting. But what’s sold as complexity in these idiosyncratic geniuses is sometimes really just a series of hollow quirks that mimic rather than build on character, entering realms of such exaggeration that the people in the stories become wholly secondary to the plots…

Read the rest here

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